Training on Understanding Economic, Social and Cultural Rights

Date: 28 September – 2 October 2015

Location: Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights,
Villa Moynier – Rue de Lausanne 120B – CP 67 – 1211 Geneva 21 – Switzerland

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The Geneva Academy organizes a training on “Understanding Economic, Social and Cultural Rights”. The courses are taught by academics including, Dr. Christophe Golay and Dr. Joanna Bourke-Martignoni, as well as senior professionals from international organizations and non-profit and are designed for civil society, staff of NGOs and national human rights institutions, representatives of government, staff from UN and other international organizations, as well as academic researchers. Continue reading

SCL Lecture: “Improving Victims’ Legal Representation at the ICC”

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  • Date: 10 June 2015
  • Time: 19:00h
  • Fee: Free
  • Venue: T.M.C. Asser Institute
  • Organiser: T.M.C. Asser Institute, the Coalition for the International Criminal Court (CICC) and the Grotius Centre for International Legal Studies of Leiden University
  • Address: R.J. Schimmelpennincklaan 20-22 , The Hague , Netherlands

Opening remarks and moderation: Gaelle Carayon, REDRESS

Panel discussions:

-          Facilitating the choice of counsel and representation, views from civil society, Jean Philippe Kot, Avocats sans Frontieresµ

-          The challenges of providing effective representation, views from a victims’ legal representative, Fidel Nsita, LRV

-          Ongoing and prospective avenues for an improved representation, views from the Registry, Fiona McKay, Head Victims Participation and Reparation Section

SCL Lectures are public and free of charge. Registration is not necessary, seats are available on a first-come-first-served basis.

University of Amsterdam: Summer Course on “Hidden Genocides”

uva-logo_enThe Graduate School of Social Sciences of the University of Amsterdam is known for its high academic standards. Its summer programme: “Hidden Genocides: Overshadowed by the Holocaust” is another example of a unique course with esteemed lecturers. Professor Alex Hinton and Professor Devon Hinton both will give a guest lecture in this programme. Academic director Anthony Holslag has managed to line up an impressive group of people presenting in this important course.

The summer course ‘Hidden Genocides’ will exist of lecturers, seminars, international guest lecturers specialised in genocide, analysing documentaries and eye witness accounts, discussions and excursions.

The course will not only look at familiar cases of genocide, like the Holocaust, Rwanda and Srebrenica, but also “hidden” and unknown genocides and the mass atrocities happening right now in South Sudan, Central Africa and Syria/ North Iraq. This course will give you an analytical model to understand and study genocide and measure proper interventions.

This three week programme is intended for students who have completed at least three years of a Bachelor’s programme in the social sciences. Master’s students and professionals are also welcome to apply.

The deadline for application is 15 June 2015. The summer course will be held between 12-31 July 2015.

Book Launch: Arabic Translation of Antonio Cassese’s International Criminal Law

Antonio Cassese International Criminal LawOn 20 May 2015, the Arabic translation of Antonio Cassese’s International Criminal Law will be officially launched in Beirut.

The book International Criminal Law is one of the most popular textbooks available in the field and provides a concise introduction to both international criminal law and international criminal procedure.

During the launch event, organised by the Embassy of Switzerland in Lebanon and Sader Legal Publishing, in cooperation with the Special Tribunal for Lebanon, distinguished speakers, including  H.E. Ashraf Rifi, Minister of Justice of the Republic of Lebanon and H.E. Francois Barras, Ambassador of Switzerland to Lebanon, will make remarks on the relevance of International Criminal Law for Lebanon and the MENA region.

This will be followed by a panel discussion, during which Christopher Gosnell, lawyer and co-reviser of International Criminal Law, will speak about the content and the relevance for academia and other professionals of the book.

Olga Kavran, head of Outreach and Legacy at the Special Tribunal for Lebanon, will elaborate on the impact of the STL on the development of international criminal law and on Lebanon.

Judge Mohammad Amin El Mahdi, former Minister and current Head of the Supreme Administrative Court and Conseil d’Etat in Egypt, will tell the audience about the importance of international criminal law and its relevance in the MENA region.

And Dr. Camille Habib, dean of the Faculty of Law at the Lebanese University, will emphasise the importance of educating Lebanese students in international criminal law.

Antonio Cassese is among the most distinguished figures in international law and international criminal justice. He was the first President of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and the Special Court for Lebanon, offered constructive suggestions on the Special Court for Sierra Leone and the International Criminal Court and actively contributed to the development of international criminal law, amongst others by his book International Criminal Law (2008).

The event will take place at the Maison de l’Avocat in Beirut, from 4-6pm and will be followed by a reception.

Leiden Summer School on International Children’s Rights

by Leiden University and the Grotius Centre for International Legal Studies

Venue: Leiden and The Hague

Date: 6-10 July 2015

Summer School 2015 International Children Rights

The Leiden Summer School on International Children’s Rights offers a great opportunity to engage with eminent professors, children’s rights experts and colleagues from all over the world and acquire state of the art knowledge of the most important global children’s rights themes.

The one week programme offers insight in highly relevant and topical issues including migration and children’s rights, children and digital technologies, children in armed conflict and conflict situations, child justice and child protection. In addition, you will be challenged to engage with experts in strategic litigation, monitoring of children’s rights and the role of civil society in implementing children’s rights.

The summer school is held in the beautiful cities of Leiden and The Hague and includes excursions to the Leiden Children’s Rights House, a youth institution and the International Criminal Court, as well as social activities. Previous editions have attracted professionals and advanced students from all over the world

The course will be coordinated by Professor Ton Liefaard, UNICEF Chair in Children’s Rights at Leiden University, and by Professor Julia Sloth-Nielsen, Professor of Children’s Rights in the Developing World at Leiden Law School

Guest speakers  will include Human Rights experts and academics.

Tuition fees for professionals are: €1100, and for students: €900.

A limited amount of applicants will be admitted to this summer school. The course is mainly aimed at professionals, but advanced students are invited to apply as well.

If you wish to apply, click here.

The deadline for applications is 1 June 2015.

ADC-ICTY and ICLB Mock Trial

Dates: 6 July – 11 July 2015

Venue: ICTY, Churchillplein 1, 2517 JW The Hague

ADC-ICTY-300x300The Association of Defence Counsel Practising Before The International Criminal Tribunal For The Former Yugoslavia (ADC-ICTY) is organising another Mock Trial this year with the support of the International Criminal Law Bureau. The Mock Trial is a one-week event hosted by the ADC-ICTY in The Hague. The week includes hands-on evening sessions for young professionals in the field of international criminal law and a one-day Mock Trial exercise in the ICTY courtroom in front of ICTY Judges and Counsel.

The evening sessions focus on practical skills and expertise and are given by experienced Defence Counsel to prepare participants for a career in international criminal law. Topics include “legal drafting”, “oral trial advocacy”, “opening and closing statements” and “ethics in international criminal law”.  Participants will be requested to make written filings in teams as well as perform in the courtroom on the day of the Mock Trial.

Participants will be allocated to one Prosecution team and three Defence teams, or play one of the two witnesses or one of the three accused.

The deadline for applications is 15 May 2015. For application or any other queries, please contact the ADC-ICTY Head Office. For more information, see the Mock Trial Flyer and Programme 2015.

2015 International Criminal Court Summer School

Date: 15-19 June 2015

Location: Irish Centre for Human Rights, National University of Ireland, University Rd, Galway, Ireland.

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The annual International Criminal Court Summer School at the Irish Centre for Human Rights is the premiere summer school specializing on the International Criminal Court (ICC). The Summer School comprises a series of intensive and interactive lectures over five days given by leading academics and legal professionals working at the ICC. Participants are provided with a detailed working knowledge of the establishment of the Court, its structures, operations, and applicable law. Specific topics covered include international crimes (genocide, war crimes, crimes against humanity & aggression), jurisdiction, modes of liability, the role of victims and prosecutorial discretion.

This year’s Summer School will include a special session on Palestine and the International Criminal Court, which will involve the participation of the Palestinian Ambassador to Ireland, Ambassador Ahmad Abdelrazek.

The summer school is attended by legal professionals, academics, postgraduate students, journalists and staff of civil society or intergovernmental organisations. A limited number of scholarships are available. To register and for more information regarding the 2015 ICC Summer School, please visit the conference website or send an email. Registrations will close on 30 May 2015.

ADC-ICTY Advocacy Training Sessions 2015

ADC ICTYThe ADC-ICTY (Association of Defence Counsel Practising Before The International Criminal Tribunal For The Former Yugoslavia) is organising a number of advocacy training sessions in 2015, focusing on a variety of essential topics in the practice of international criminal law. These are one-day events taking place at the ICTY in The Hague, presented by renowned Defence Counsel and ADC-ICTY members. Certificates are awarded and the sessions count towards CLE credits.

  • 25 April 2015:  Colleen Rohan – Drafting Trial Motions, Final Briefs and Appeals
  • 16 May 2015:  Christopher Gosnell – Preparing Oral Arguments
  • 6 June 2015:  Marie O’Leary – Witness Proofing
  • 22 August 2015:  Dragan Ivetić – Expert Witnesses

 For further information, click here.

The Armenian Genocide Legacy 100 Years On

ArmeniaTHE HAGUE – On 5, 6 and 7 March 2015, 22 experts gathered for a conference at The Hague Institute for Global Justice to look at the legacy of the Armenian Genocide from the perspective of law, humanities, media, arts and letters, politics and education. Speakers focused on the influence that this event and its denial have had on research and practice in their disciplines. This event was organized by Alexis Demirdjian (Centennial Project Foundation), the NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies (NIOD) and the University of Southern California Institute of Armenian Studies (USC IAS).

“On the centennial of the Armenian Genocide, organisations and State agencies around the world will acknowledge, reflect and consider its impact and relevance today. Discussions will ignite in academic institutions, classrooms, around dinner tables, in community centres and church halls, in centres of government and in the press. Much of these discussions in the past have focused on the Genocide itself, leaving little space to consider its relevance today. Addressing this issue, therefore, was the contribution of this conference and of the upcoming book to be published by the end of 2015,” said Alexis Demirdjian, an attorney who has many years experience working in the various criminal justice institutions located in the city of The Hague. Continue reading

The International Criminal Court at a Crossroads

by Samuel Linehan

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The International Criminal Court

The challenges for the International Criminal Court posed by state non-cooperation and potential new situations were considered at a panel discussion hosted by Chatham House and Doughty Street Chambers on 11 March 2015.

The panellists were Shehzad Charania, Legal Adviser and Head, International Law Team, British Embassy, The Hague; Liz Evenson, Senior Counsel, Human Rights Watch; and Dr Rod Rastan, Legal Adviser, Office of the Prosecutor, International Criminal Court. The chair was Elizabeth Wilmshurst. The Chatham House Rule was not applied.

State non-cooperation

General observations

Liz Evenson noted that there are different modes and levels of cooperation with the ICC. Some obstacles can be overcome; for example remote investigation may be possible where there is no access to a territory. However, as reflected in the new OTP investigative policy, in situ investigations are preferable. Other obstacles cannot be overcome, such as refusal to execute an arrest warrant. The Kenya situation demonstrated the effect of non-cooperation on the outcome of proceedings.

Rod Rastan emphasised that cooperation is fundamental to a court which lacks the investigative and enforcement apparatus of a developed jurisdiction. The issue was not resolved by the Rome Statute, as the only remedy for non-cooperation is a reference to the UN Security Council or the Assembly of States Parties. This requires a collective response from the international community. Cooperation worked at the ICTY, as initial hesitation was overcome with the assistance of NATO and the EU.

Shehzad Charania considered what the international community can do in the face of non-cooperation. In the Darfur Situation, the matter was referred to the Security Council by the Pre-Trial Chamber. The signs there are not good, despite the UK’s support for the ICC. The same is true of the Libya Situation. An indication of the current climate is the fact that at present the Security Council cannot even agree to acknowledge a letter from the President of the ICC. The low point was the failure to refer the situation in Syria. However there are some signs of progress. The ICC has a central position in various policy debates, for example on the protection of women and journalists in conflict. The Security Council has never entered into discussion of concrete measures in response to non-cooperation; the obvious response would be sanctions. The Assembly of States Parties has agreed to avoid all non-essential contact with indictees. Continue reading